esmit38

This user hasn't shared any biographical information

Quantum Learning for Teachers Summer 2011 Public Workshops

At the QLN Campus in Oceanside, California

Quantum Learning helps bring passion and fun back to teaching. It works because QL-trained teachers learn the how and the why from top facilitators who model effective QL classroom methods throughout the workshop.Teachers leave our programs with tools they understand and know how to use in their classrooms. As a result,students with QL teachers attain higher achievement levels and gain improved attitudes toward learning.

Choose between two 5-day public workshops (click on either date for the informational flyer and registration form)

June 27 – July 1, 2011
QLN Campus – Oceanside, CA

July 25-29, 2011
QLN Campus – Oceanside, CA

 

, , , ,

Leave a comment

13 Ideas To Get Kids Active

Thanks to PTO Today for this great article!

Field day. Create an obstacle course, play kickball, or set up a bowling alley with pins made from soda bottles partially filled with sand. Older kids love messy games like the water balloon toss, or try having teams move a pile of flour from one end of the line to the other by passing it over their heads in a small pail. Relay races and events modeled on the Olympics are popular, as well.

Gym games. Hold a gym night or add gym games to another family night. Team games add excitement. Two favorites: the shoe shuffle, a relay in which kids shuffle across the floor with shoeboxes on their feet; and the drop-and-pop relay, in which kids run to a chair, sit on a balloon and try to pop it, then run back to tag the next person in line. An imaginative obstacle course using hoops to hop through and boxes to crawl through can also be great fun.

Fun run. A fun run can be a great fundraiser, but it’s also a good way to build school spirit and get more parents involved. Typically, kids run laps and get pledges per lap. You also can work with the PE teacher to teach kids fundamentals like the importance of warming up and pacing themselves as they run.

Walkathon. A walkathon is like a fun run, but it usually is extended over a period of time while a fun run takes place on a single day. The Briarlake Elementary PTA in Decatur, Ga., created a “million steps challenge”, giving students pedometers to track how many steps they took during a 40-day period. When the steps were totaled, they had taken enough to cross the United States five times.

For the rest of this great PTO article, please click here.

 


, , ,

Leave a comment

Character Education Conference

At the upcoming Character Education Conference in San Francisco, Quantum Learning representative Cami Eiskamp will be hosting a workshop.  Cami has worked with administrators, teachers, students and parents as an instructor and trainer around the globe for more than 13 years.  Her witty, outgoing personality — combined with her highly interactive training approach — keeps audiences energized and engaged.  She models applicable instructional/leadership strategies that all attendees can use immediately when they return to school. Cami is a San Diego native, currently in her seventh year as a high school Spanish and leadership teacher.  She was voted Teacher of the Year by staff and students.  If you are attending the conference, you can join Cami on Thursday, 2:30 – 3:45 p.m.

 

 

 

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

POWER WHOOSH!

Below you can see a video of Kelli Myers’ Quantum Learning 5th grade class doing a “power whoosh.” A “Power Whoosh” is when on cue, everyone claps their hands three times in unison, then sends all of their positive energy to a designated person. It is a part of Quantum Learning’s “If It’s Worth Learning, It’s Worth Celebrating.” Celebration builds the desire for success. So celebrate often!

, , , , , , , , , ,

7 Comments

Recharging classroom joy with techniques from Quantum Learning

Teachers need techniques. There is no shame in a new teacher adopting a great lesson plan from a generous master teacher. The sharing of “best practices” is a common activity at staff meetings. As so many veteran teachers will admit, some of their best ideas were “borrowed” from colleagues. It’s what teachers do – brag about a great unit they just taught, helpfully hint at a classroom management strategy that a colleague might need, and refresh their dwindling enthusiasm at the pool of shared experience and creativity.

In San Diego County, educators, schools, and students have the good fortune to be located near the home office of a dynamic education company that offers its own well of energetic, inspired ideas: Quantum Learning. This is not an advertisement; this is a testimony. Quantum Learning uses brain research to inform its instructional methodology. They also offer brain-based methods for learners via summer camps. But that sounds so dry. Really, the impact of what Quantum Learning delivers in its teacher workshops and camps can best be conveyed by a description of a Quantum Learning-infused classroom.

Imagine a classroom filled with color and light – a cozy lamp, a bright tablecloth – and posters displaying positive messages such as “Today became great when YOU arrived.” Listen – there is music playing, upbeat as you enter the room and soothing as you work. There’s a teacher who gets the class up and moving at frequent intervals, using body motions, choral response, and visual cues to engage kids and help them remember concepts. Notes are taken in color with picture drawing encouraged, and students whose brains don’t work in a linear mode are taught mind-mapping instead of traditional notes. Life skills are imparted along with academics – keys such as “Failure leads to success” encourage kids to see their efforts as building blocks towards success when they struggle. Kids start class charged up and ready for learning and leave class with concrete knowledge about what they know and don’t know and how to move forward.

It is difficult to share the techniques with a colleague who has never “been to the well” – to outsiders, it seems gimmicky, perhaps even cultish. But teachers who have attended a Quantum Learning workshop and tried the strategies in their own classroom know how powerful they can be. These days, with tight budgets limiting the acquisition of expensive toys like smart boards and individual student laptops, our schools are more in need than ever of good strategies that help kids learn, make school a positive, energetic, attractive place, and infuse joy back into the teachers’ efforts.

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

1 Comment

Teen Study Habits

Bobbi DePorter was featured on San Diego Channel 6 News  September 15th. She discussed Teen Study Habits and how to help set up your student for success.

To watch the full video go to:  http://www.sandiego6.com/mediacenter/local.aspx and click on Teen Study Habits.

, , ,

Leave a comment

How Do We Fix Our Schools?

When CNN asked How Do We Fix Our Schools,  Mark Reardon, QLN COO,  had a strong answer:

It’s about teacher competence. It’s always been about teacher competence. Although teachers attend and graduate from a teacher program, for the most part they are inadequately equipped to facilitate learning with today’s kids in today’s world; a world of technology, graphics, multi-tasking, quick information “sound bites”, and relationships. Kids are immersed in a world of instant connectivity, instant gratification and advanced visual stimulation. These characteristics impact students’ attention spans requiring teachers to rethink and redesign the learning environment and the way students learn the content.

With the growing implementation of value-added analysis, the statistics are undeniably clear– teacher competence is a significant contributor to the quality of student learning. This is not a new belief. We’ve intuitively known this for decades. The analyses now prove it. It’s about teacher competence. How to fix that? Implement teacher residency programs modeled after the medical profession. Teacher competence is enhanced by consistent and frequent interactions with master teachers. These master teachers impart best educational practices and partner with the teacher-in-residence to ensure competence.

It’s about student competence. The unfortunate and disproportional emphasis on standardized tests as the sole determinant of student achievement has misguided our educational efforts. Tests on standards are important to show content mastery. The missing ingredient is the teaching of critical thinking to boost students’ competence in approaching, analyzing and finding solutions to real-life problems. The direct orchestration of business, political, social and scientific experiences that immerse students in the complexity of today’s problems creates milieu in which critical thinking and collaboration grows.

It’s about character. There is an undeniable connection between character and content mastery. Teachers spend a considerable amount of time addressing character–effort, choices, and responsibility–for they know that the development of our character is the foundation to achievement. Character development is a conscious and deliberate act. It is not left to chance. Building the culture of the classroom upon character traits sets a strong foundation for a healthy learning environment. Kids feel safe and respected as they improve the quality of who they are. Additionally, character traits can be developed as they emerge within content–literature, social science, science, and/or math. Through the lens of character traits, students see the connection character has on other people’s as well as their own attitudes, choices and actions.

It’s a daunting endeavor to “fix” our schools. No one solution is the answer. The passion and commitment of educators to do what is effective for their students is a great place to start.

, , , , , , ,

1 Comment